Commonwealth Bank of Australia introduces reforms to tackle alleged misconduct

Commonwealth Bank of Australia introduces reforms to tackle alleged misconduct

Commonwealth Bank of Australia introduces reforms to tackle alleged misconduct The Commonwealth Bank of Australia has told the Senate it has introduced new reforms to tackle alleged misconduct in its insurance branch.

This comes following a stoush over CBA chief executive Ian Nerve’s no-show at the hearing who is believed to have told the committee that he and other bank executives were unable to attend due to insufficient notice.

CBA also gave its side of events regarding the vexed sacking of CommInsure whistle-blower Benjamin Koh.

CBA’s submission lodged with a Senate committee claimed that out of the five CommInsure customers being discussed, that two had been paid before this year and another two had been paid after a review and the final claim had been “consistent with the policy.”

The misconduct allegations which revolve around alleged tampering with medical reports and denial of claims based on old medical definitions were brought to light last month by former chief medical officer Benjamin Koh.

Dr Koh has filed an unfair dismissal claim against CBA, alleging he was sacked by the bank in August last year for being a whistleblower.

Koh has accused the CBA of continuing to deny justice to victims of its financial planning scandal.
CBA says Dr Koh was discharged for “serious and repeated breaches of customers’ privacy, involving highly sensitive material, including medical and financial information over a lengthy period of time.”

It says the doctor’s statements and conduct during the investigation of his breaches were also deceptive.

Dr Koh is expected to give evidence to the Senate committee at a hearing in Sydney tomorrow.